RWE einsichtig: Kein Palmöl-Kraftwerk in England

22.11.2006

Die britische RWE-Tochter Npower verzichtet darauf, als erster Energiekonzern auf der Insel Strom aus Palmöl zu produzieren. Begründung: eine nachhaltige Palmöl-Produktion könne nicht garantiert werden. Zuvor waren bei Npower reichlich Protestbriefe eingegangen. Allein von unserer Webseite haben sich seit dem 10.10.2006 über 6200 Menschen an der Aktion beteiligt. Während Npower die Einschätzung von uns bestätigt, dass Energie aus Palmöl niemals nachhaltig sein kann, halten die Stadtwerke Schwäbisch Hall an ihren Plänen fest, Ende des Jahres ein Palmöl-Kraftwerk in Betrieb zu nehmen.

Die britische RWE-Tochter Npower verzichtet darauf, als erster Energiekonzern auf der Insel Strom aus Palmöl zu produzieren. Begründung: eine nachhaltige Palmöl-Produktion könne nicht garantiert werden. Zuvor waren bei Npower reichlich Protestbriefe eingegangen. Allein von unserer Webseite haben sich seit dem 10.10.2006 über 6200 Menschen an der Aktion beteiligt. Während Npower die Einschätzung von uns bestätigt, dass Energie aus Palmöl niemals nachhaltig sein kann, halten die Stadtwerke Schwäbisch Hall an ihren Plänen fest, Ende des Jahres ein Palmöl-Kraftwerk in Betrieb zu nehmen.

Hier die Orginal-Mitteilung aus England
Dear Mr Jones,
Many thanks for your email. Palm oil has been trialed at Littlebrook power station and is one of the many 'biofuels' we are exploring in our power stations alongside wood chips, sawdust, olive residue and palm kernels. These fuels are known as 'carbon neutral' because burning them only releases back into the atmosphere the CO2 recently absorbed during their growth. At Littlebrook we were evaluating the possibility of c onverting our oil-fired power station to burn 100% biomass. This could have replaced the need for some fossil fuel generation and resulted in annual CO2 reductions equivalent to taking 220,000 cars off the road. However I can confirm that we have decided the plan is not currently feasible.

The key reason for the decision has been the impact of strict sustainability criteria we set ourselves, based on the standards established by the Round Table on Sustainable Palm Oil, a joint venture between business and the environmental group WWF. We set out to ensure none of our palm oil came from plantations that might have caused rainforest damage or infringed the rights of local inhabitants or workers. While it was our strong feeling that there was enough 'sustainable' palm oil available for the large volumes we were seeking, we found the industry processes for checking this were not yet developed enough to prove this for certain. RWE npower has no current plans for future palm oil purchases. We would consider any future use against the same three criteria of commercial, technical and sustainable viability.

We believe that, as a major power generator and supporter of a move to a low-carbon economy, we have to explore all commercially sensible options which could benefit the environment. Demonstrating that 'biomass' fuels are practical on a major scale in the UK is a crucial step in stimulating the development of a domestic energy crop industry which can help the UK Government meet its renewable energy and carbon dioxide reduction targets.
I hope you find this information useful. If you have any more questions, please contact me.
Anita Longley
Head of Corporate Responsibility RWE npower
01793877777
anita.longley@rwenpower.com